Shown above is a Brown Charcoal, notice the more warm color versus the Silver Charcoal. Charcoal is not considered a color by U.C. Davis Veterinary School of California but rather a special type of pattern created by combining one copy of the ALC Agouti gene and one copy of the domestic cat non-agouti gene (Apb/a). They're uncommon and difficult to breed for but present a striking appearance of strong markings around the eyes with a dark cape along the spine.

In addition to the Silver Bengal, we are now beginning to look at pattern. Charcoal is not considered a color by U.C. Davis Veterinary School of California but rather a special type of pattern created by combining one copy of the ALC Agouti gene and one copy of the domestic cat non-agouti gene (Apb/a). They're uncommon and difficult to breed for but present a striking appearance of strong markings around the eyes with a dark cape along the spine.

Seal Mink Spotted Tabby

Always born pure white coat and maintain their bright blue eyes. Markings can sometimes start to appear as early as a couple of weeks and continue to develop into adulthood. They carry two copies of the Siamese (cs/cs) color gene.

Typically born with dark markings, their eyes change from a bright blue at birth to a emerald green color. They are a combination of two Burmese (cb/cb) color gene bred together.

Silver Charcoal Spotted Tabby

Charcoal Snows

Silver Bengals are bred with an inhibitor color gene, they are tricky to breed for as there is no color test available. In order to avoid tarnish (brown showing through) we attempt to pair Silver parents together, however this can be challenging with the gene pool still developing.

Typically born with medium markings, their eyes change from a bright blue at birth to a darker aqua color. They are a combination of the Siamese and Burmese (cs/cb) color gene bred together.

Silver Spotted Tabby

Marbled Bengals are another type of pattern, instead of spots we see shown above an interesting swirl of markings. This pattern can occur in all colors as long as both parents carry the appropriate gene and recognized by TICA for showing.

Brown Spotted Tabby

This unique look occurs when there are two copies of the domestic cat non-agouti gene (a/a) which causes a ghost like appearance with the rosettes among a solid black coat. Melanistic is very uncommon and currently not accepted for showing in TICA.

LIBERTY

BENGALS

The most common and traditional color of the Bengal breed. Usually born with blue eyes that turn green or gold with age.

A Blue Bengal is a combination of carrying two copies of the Dilute (d/d) color gene. They are fairly uncommon and currently not recognized by TICA for showing.

Melanistic Bengals

Brown Charcoal Spotted Tabby

Blue Spotted Tabby

Seal Lynx Point Spotted Tabby

Shown above is a Charcoal Seal Lynx Point, note the bright blue eyes, dark nose and the white markings around the eyes. The Charcoal pattern can occur in any color, including but not limited to: Brown, Seal Lynx Point, Seal Mink, Seal Sepia, etc. Charcoal is not considered a color by U.C. Davis Veterinary School of California but rather a special type of pattern created by combining one copy of the ALC Agouti gene and one copy of the domestic cat non-agouti gene (Apb/a).  They're uncommon and difficult to breed for but present a striking appearance of strong markings around the eyes with a dark cape along the spine.

Seal Sepia Spotted Tabby

Marbled Bengals

There are many variations of other colors, these are just a few of the more common ones. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have by email at: LibertyBengals@gmail.com

There are many beautiful colors represented in the Bengal breed, here are a few: